Source: aimenkazmi

Pens are telescopes. Sometimes they can can see far away things, even under water, sometimes they see what happened long ago.

Pens talk to their pen caps, they argue a lot about who is bigger. Both pens and caps enjoy hide and seek - ready or not,  here i come!

Pens are expert sleeve travelers. They sleep under pillows and inside toy trucks. 

Almond blossoms at the Headstart School, Kuri Campus
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Camera
Samsung GT-N7100
ISO
80
Aperture
f/2.6
Exposure
1/1324th
Focal Length
3mm

Almond blossoms at the Headstart School, Kuri Campus

6inspiration, maria montessori, kuri, headstart school, spring, blossoms,

HOW WE TEACH Phonics
According to the synthetic phonics approach, students learn that there are many ways for writing down the same sound. At NJ’s House, we work by teaching word solving actionsand spelling patterns rather than leaving all the heavy lifting of reading and writing to rote memorization.
The brain is a sophisticated instrument, it’s a processor, not just a storage device for remembered data. By giving students strategies that require processing and analysis, we hope to give their mind muscles some exercise. Rather than tell students the correct spelling for a word, we ask them to use invented spelling (write it how it sounds) when creating their first drafts. Then, in a one-on-one consultation with each student, the teacher helps the child re-read his work, self-correct, and identify errors.
He is shown how to look up the correct spellings and document them in his own dictionary. Through subsequent drafts, each writer improves the text he is working on, until a final product is ready.
ZoomInfo
HOW WE TEACH Phonics
According to the synthetic phonics approach, students learn that there are many ways for writing down the same sound. At NJ’s House, we work by teaching word solving actionsand spelling patterns rather than leaving all the heavy lifting of reading and writing to rote memorization.
The brain is a sophisticated instrument, it’s a processor, not just a storage device for remembered data. By giving students strategies that require processing and analysis, we hope to give their mind muscles some exercise. Rather than tell students the correct spelling for a word, we ask them to use invented spelling (write it how it sounds) when creating their first drafts. Then, in a one-on-one consultation with each student, the teacher helps the child re-read his work, self-correct, and identify errors.
He is shown how to look up the correct spellings and document them in his own dictionary. Through subsequent drafts, each writer improves the text he is working on, until a final product is ready.
ZoomInfo
HOW WE TEACH Phonics
According to the synthetic phonics approach, students learn that there are many ways for writing down the same sound. At NJ’s House, we work by teaching word solving actionsand spelling patterns rather than leaving all the heavy lifting of reading and writing to rote memorization.
The brain is a sophisticated instrument, it’s a processor, not just a storage device for remembered data. By giving students strategies that require processing and analysis, we hope to give their mind muscles some exercise. Rather than tell students the correct spelling for a word, we ask them to use invented spelling (write it how it sounds) when creating their first drafts. Then, in a one-on-one consultation with each student, the teacher helps the child re-read his work, self-correct, and identify errors.
He is shown how to look up the correct spellings and document them in his own dictionary. Through subsequent drafts, each writer improves the text he is working on, until a final product is ready.
ZoomInfo
HOW WE TEACH Phonics
According to the synthetic phonics approach, students learn that there are many ways for writing down the same sound. At NJ’s House, we work by teaching word solving actionsand spelling patterns rather than leaving all the heavy lifting of reading and writing to rote memorization.
The brain is a sophisticated instrument, it’s a processor, not just a storage device for remembered data. By giving students strategies that require processing and analysis, we hope to give their mind muscles some exercise. Rather than tell students the correct spelling for a word, we ask them to use invented spelling (write it how it sounds) when creating their first drafts. Then, in a one-on-one consultation with each student, the teacher helps the child re-read his work, self-correct, and identify errors.
He is shown how to look up the correct spellings and document them in his own dictionary. Through subsequent drafts, each writer improves the text he is working on, until a final product is ready.
ZoomInfo

HOW WE TEACH Phonics

According to the synthetic phonics approach, students learn that there are many ways for writing down the same sound. At NJ’s House, we work by teaching word solving actionsand spelling patterns rather than leaving all the heavy lifting of reading and writing to rote memorization.

The brain is a sophisticated instrument, it’s a processor, not just a storage device for remembered data. By giving students strategies that require processing and analysis, we hope to give their mind muscles some exercise. Rather than tell students the correct spelling for a word, we ask them to use invented spelling (write it how it sounds) when creating their first drafts. Then, in a one-on-one consultation with each student, the teacher helps the child re-read his work, self-correct, and identify errors.

He is shown how to look up the correct spellings and document them in his own dictionary. Through subsequent drafts, each writer improves the text he is working on, until a final product is ready.

6year 1, invented spelling, phonics, oxford reading tree, floppy phonics, writers workshop, no rote learning,

SUPPORTING INQUIRY
Year 1 students gather around their class computer as the teacher transforms one student’s question about Venus into a teachable moment about using Google search, for the whole group.

6researchskills, supportinginquiry, teachable moments, solar system, science, ICT, technology in the classroom, year 1,

Coming Soon (or at least in the closer-than-distant future):

The NJ’s House original book of poems for year-round phonics instruction, written by teachers right here in  Islamabad, Pakistan.

6sharedreadingtexts, phonics, poetry, NJ's publications,

Read . Make . Write
It is really important to us that any student writing we share with parents is authentically the child’s own, independent work. That’s why we employ a number of tools and manipulatives that draw the interest of our students, as well as support their concentration. Nothing could be easier than guiding the child to write the words listed, without ensuring that she can read and understand them. Thus far at least, the results we are seeing from students reading and writing this way are really promising.
ZoomInfo
Read . Make . Write
It is really important to us that any student writing we share with parents is authentically the child’s own, independent work. That’s why we employ a number of tools and manipulatives that draw the interest of our students, as well as support their concentration. Nothing could be easier than guiding the child to write the words listed, without ensuring that she can read and understand them. Thus far at least, the results we are seeing from students reading and writing this way are really promising.
ZoomInfo
Read . Make . Write
It is really important to us that any student writing we share with parents is authentically the child’s own, independent work. That’s why we employ a number of tools and manipulatives that draw the interest of our students, as well as support their concentration. Nothing could be easier than guiding the child to write the words listed, without ensuring that she can read and understand them. Thus far at least, the results we are seeing from students reading and writing this way are really promising.
ZoomInfo
Read . Make . Write
It is really important to us that any student writing we share with parents is authentically the child’s own, independent work. That’s why we employ a number of tools and manipulatives that draw the interest of our students, as well as support their concentration. Nothing could be easier than guiding the child to write the words listed, without ensuring that she can read and understand them. Thus far at least, the results we are seeing from students reading and writing this way are really promising.
ZoomInfo
Read . Make . Write
It is really important to us that any student writing we share with parents is authentically the child’s own, independent work. That’s why we employ a number of tools and manipulatives that draw the interest of our students, as well as support their concentration. Nothing could be easier than guiding the child to write the words listed, without ensuring that she can read and understand them. Thus far at least, the results we are seeing from students reading and writing this way are really promising.
ZoomInfo
Read . Make . Write
It is really important to us that any student writing we share with parents is authentically the child’s own, independent work. That’s why we employ a number of tools and manipulatives that draw the interest of our students, as well as support their concentration. Nothing could be easier than guiding the child to write the words listed, without ensuring that she can read and understand them. Thus far at least, the results we are seeing from students reading and writing this way are really promising.
ZoomInfo
Read . Make . Write
It is really important to us that any student writing we share with parents is authentically the child’s own, independent work. That’s why we employ a number of tools and manipulatives that draw the interest of our students, as well as support their concentration. Nothing could be easier than guiding the child to write the words listed, without ensuring that she can read and understand them. Thus far at least, the results we are seeing from students reading and writing this way are really promising.
ZoomInfo

Read . Make . Write

It is really important to us that any student writing we share with parents is authentically the child’s own, independent work. That’s why we employ a number of tools and manipulatives that draw the interest of our students, as well as support their concentration. 

Nothing could be easier than guiding the child to write the words listed, without ensuring that she can read and understand them. Thus far at least, the results we are seeing from students reading and writing this way are really promising.

6phonics, readwithmewednesday, readmakewrite, alphabet tiles, EY1, fouryearolds,

Constructing Sentences in EY1Students put their knowledge of high-frequency words to use by creating sentences using pictures and some of the most common prepositions and words in the English language."We go to the park"."I go to a circus".The cards and pictures are from a book the students read in class together.
ZoomInfo
Camera
Samsung GT-N7100
ISO
Aperture
Exposure
Focal Length

Constructing Sentences in EY1

Students put their knowledge of high-frequency words to use by creating sentences using pictures and some of the most common prepositions and words in the English language.

"We go to the park".
"I go to a circus".

The cards and pictures are from a book the students read in class together.

Spring!

Source: kolbisneat

The Odd One OutThe students in EY1 are learning about odd and even numbers, and those in EY2 are revising them. To help them understand the language behind these words, we talked about being “the odd one out”. To introduce the concept, I taught EY2 a fun irish dance, where everyone stands in two “even” lines with each dancer waiting across from their partner. Then one by one each couple takes a turn holding hands and skipping up the line and back.We had some fun with the dancing, then the class was called to attention and everyone was given a number and asked to “arrive” in sequence to the “ball”. As head game-maker, I announced all guests at the door. One came first, but she couldn’t dance by herself so we all agreed that she felt a little odd just standing there, she did a superb job of acting out of sorts. When Two arrived there were two dancers, they were evenly matched so they could dance and enjoy themselves. When Three arrived at the ball, being the third dancer, she was the odd one out, she made a sad face. As soon as Four came, everyone had a partner, they were even. And so the party progressed with some oddness and lots of giggling until ten dancers were skipping excitedly about the yard.The students all understood how to find the odd, pairless counter in a set of counters in order to determine whether the number represented is odd or even. And while that will take out some of the guesswork used in identifying numbers, I also want to encourage students to think of even numbers as multiples of two, i.e. made up of pairs. 
I was thinking of other kinds of pairs; shoes, and socks seemed the most obvious. To help students understand visually the deal with the pairs, I made these flash cards and worksheets. You can download the PDF file, right here.
ZoomInfo
The Odd One OutThe students in EY1 are learning about odd and even numbers, and those in EY2 are revising them. To help them understand the language behind these words, we talked about being “the odd one out”. To introduce the concept, I taught EY2 a fun irish dance, where everyone stands in two “even” lines with each dancer waiting across from their partner. Then one by one each couple takes a turn holding hands and skipping up the line and back.We had some fun with the dancing, then the class was called to attention and everyone was given a number and asked to “arrive” in sequence to the “ball”. As head game-maker, I announced all guests at the door. One came first, but she couldn’t dance by herself so we all agreed that she felt a little odd just standing there, she did a superb job of acting out of sorts. When Two arrived there were two dancers, they were evenly matched so they could dance and enjoy themselves. When Three arrived at the ball, being the third dancer, she was the odd one out, she made a sad face. As soon as Four came, everyone had a partner, they were even. And so the party progressed with some oddness and lots of giggling until ten dancers were skipping excitedly about the yard.The students all understood how to find the odd, pairless counter in a set of counters in order to determine whether the number represented is odd or even. And while that will take out some of the guesswork used in identifying numbers, I also want to encourage students to think of even numbers as multiples of two, i.e. made up of pairs. 
I was thinking of other kinds of pairs; shoes, and socks seemed the most obvious. To help students understand visually the deal with the pairs, I made these flash cards and worksheets. You can download the PDF file, right here.
ZoomInfo
The Odd One OutThe students in EY1 are learning about odd and even numbers, and those in EY2 are revising them. To help them understand the language behind these words, we talked about being “the odd one out”. To introduce the concept, I taught EY2 a fun irish dance, where everyone stands in two “even” lines with each dancer waiting across from their partner. Then one by one each couple takes a turn holding hands and skipping up the line and back.We had some fun with the dancing, then the class was called to attention and everyone was given a number and asked to “arrive” in sequence to the “ball”. As head game-maker, I announced all guests at the door. One came first, but she couldn’t dance by herself so we all agreed that she felt a little odd just standing there, she did a superb job of acting out of sorts. When Two arrived there were two dancers, they were evenly matched so they could dance and enjoy themselves. When Three arrived at the ball, being the third dancer, she was the odd one out, she made a sad face. As soon as Four came, everyone had a partner, they were even. And so the party progressed with some oddness and lots of giggling until ten dancers were skipping excitedly about the yard.The students all understood how to find the odd, pairless counter in a set of counters in order to determine whether the number represented is odd or even. And while that will take out some of the guesswork used in identifying numbers, I also want to encourage students to think of even numbers as multiples of two, i.e. made up of pairs. 
I was thinking of other kinds of pairs; shoes, and socks seemed the most obvious. To help students understand visually the deal with the pairs, I made these flash cards and worksheets. You can download the PDF file, right here.
ZoomInfo
The Odd One OutThe students in EY1 are learning about odd and even numbers, and those in EY2 are revising them. To help them understand the language behind these words, we talked about being “the odd one out”. To introduce the concept, I taught EY2 a fun irish dance, where everyone stands in two “even” lines with each dancer waiting across from their partner. Then one by one each couple takes a turn holding hands and skipping up the line and back.We had some fun with the dancing, then the class was called to attention and everyone was given a number and asked to “arrive” in sequence to the “ball”. As head game-maker, I announced all guests at the door. One came first, but she couldn’t dance by herself so we all agreed that she felt a little odd just standing there, she did a superb job of acting out of sorts. When Two arrived there were two dancers, they were evenly matched so they could dance and enjoy themselves. When Three arrived at the ball, being the third dancer, she was the odd one out, she made a sad face. As soon as Four came, everyone had a partner, they were even. And so the party progressed with some oddness and lots of giggling until ten dancers were skipping excitedly about the yard.The students all understood how to find the odd, pairless counter in a set of counters in order to determine whether the number represented is odd or even. And while that will take out some of the guesswork used in identifying numbers, I also want to encourage students to think of even numbers as multiples of two, i.e. made up of pairs. 
I was thinking of other kinds of pairs; shoes, and socks seemed the most obvious. To help students understand visually the deal with the pairs, I made these flash cards and worksheets. You can download the PDF file, right here.
ZoomInfo
The Odd One OutThe students in EY1 are learning about odd and even numbers, and those in EY2 are revising them. To help them understand the language behind these words, we talked about being “the odd one out”. To introduce the concept, I taught EY2 a fun irish dance, where everyone stands in two “even” lines with each dancer waiting across from their partner. Then one by one each couple takes a turn holding hands and skipping up the line and back.We had some fun with the dancing, then the class was called to attention and everyone was given a number and asked to “arrive” in sequence to the “ball”. As head game-maker, I announced all guests at the door. One came first, but she couldn’t dance by herself so we all agreed that she felt a little odd just standing there, she did a superb job of acting out of sorts. When Two arrived there were two dancers, they were evenly matched so they could dance and enjoy themselves. When Three arrived at the ball, being the third dancer, she was the odd one out, she made a sad face. As soon as Four came, everyone had a partner, they were even. And so the party progressed with some oddness and lots of giggling until ten dancers were skipping excitedly about the yard.The students all understood how to find the odd, pairless counter in a set of counters in order to determine whether the number represented is odd or even. And while that will take out some of the guesswork used in identifying numbers, I also want to encourage students to think of even numbers as multiples of two, i.e. made up of pairs. 
I was thinking of other kinds of pairs; shoes, and socks seemed the most obvious. To help students understand visually the deal with the pairs, I made these flash cards and worksheets. You can download the PDF file, right here.
ZoomInfo

The Odd One Out
The students in EY1 are learning about odd and even numbers, and those in EY2 are revising them. To help them understand the language behind these words, we talked about being “the odd one out”. 

To introduce the concept, I taught EY2 a fun irish dance, where everyone stands in two “even” lines with each dancer waiting across from their partner. Then one by one each couple takes a turn holding hands and skipping up the line and back.

We had some fun with the dancing, then the class was called to attention and everyone was given a number and asked to “arrive” in sequence to the “ball”. As head game-maker, I announced all guests at the door. One came first, but she couldn’t dance by herself so we all agreed that she felt a little odd just standing there, she did a superb job of acting out of sorts. When Two arrived there were two dancers, they were evenly matched so they could dance and enjoy themselves. When Three arrived at the ball, being the third dancer, she was the odd one out, she made a sad face. As soon as Four came, everyone had a partner, they were even. And so the party progressed with some oddness and lots of giggling until ten dancers were skipping excitedly about the yard.

The students all understood how to find the odd, pairless counter in a set of counters in order to determine whether the number represented is odd or even. And while that will take out some of the guesswork used in identifying numbers, I also want to encourage students to think of even numbers as multiples of two, i.e. made up of pairs. 

I was thinking of other kinds of pairs; shoes, and socks seemed the most obvious. To help students understand visually the deal with the pairs, I made these flash cards and worksheets. You can download the PDF file, right here.

6freebies, mathmagicmonday, odd and even, dance, pairs, matching, mathematics, concepts in mathematics, play based learning, pyp,

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